First Ebola Patient Diagnosed in the U.S. Dies

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General Information

Source:
NBC Nightly News
Creator:
Brian Williams/Ron Mott
Event Date:
10/08/2014
Air/Publish Date:
10/08/2014
Resource Type:
Video News Report
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
2014
Clip Length:
00:02:58

Description

Thomas Eric Duncan has died of Ebola at a hospital in Dallas, Texas, as questions rise surrounding the level of care he received. The 2014 Ebola outbreak has killed more than 3,000 people in West Africa.

Citation

MLA

"First Ebola Patient Diagnosed in the U.S. Dies." Ron Mott, correspondent. NBC Nightly News. NBCUniversal Media. 8 Oct. 2014. NBC Learn. Web. 9 January 2016.

APA

Mott, R. (Reporter), & Williams, B. (Anchor). (2014, October 8). First Ebola Patient Diagnosed in the U.S. Dies. [Television series episode]. NBC Nightly News. Retrieved from https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=71893

CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE

"First Ebola Patient Diagnosed in the U.S. Dies" NBC Nightly News, New York, NY: NBC Universal, 10/08/2014. Accessed Sat Jan 9 2016 from NBC Learn: https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=71893

Transcript

First Ebola Patient Diagnosed in the U.S. Dies

BRIAN WILLIAMS, anchor:

The first patient diagnosed with Ebola in the United States has died of Ebola in a Dallas hospital bringing more attention now to the questions surrounding his care and whether he'd be alive today if he'd been treated for Ebola when he first sought medical attention. Thomas Duncan was 42 years-old. And his death comes as the U.S. is scrambling to set up screening for incoming passengers at major airports of entry. It's where we begin tonight. NBC's Ron Mott is in Dallas. Ron, good evening.

RON MOTT, reporting:

Brian, good evening to you. A late development to report, a man was brought here to the hospital today. He is a member of the Dallas County sheriff's office. He was in the apartment where Thomas Eric Duncan was staying. The officer was there to serve that quarantine order on Duncan's family, a family now suddenly prepared to say their final good-byes to their lost loved one. Thomas Eric Duncan died shortly before eight local time this morning, eight days after being diagnosed with Ebola.

DR. TOM FRIEDEN (CDC): Today we are deeply saddened by the death of the patient in Dallas. Despite maximal interventions, we learned today that he passed away.

MOTT: Duncan's nephew left the hospital without speaking. But a question many are asking tonight, did a two-day delay hospitalizing Duncan ultimately cost him his life? He complained of symptoms on the 24th, went to the hospital on the 26th but was sent home with antibiotics. Two days later he returned by ambulance. He was given fluids, put on a ventilator and treated with an experimental drug. Now comes the delicate and critical process of handling Duncan's body, which is dangerously contagious. Wearing protective gear, workers must wrap the body in three layers of plastic for either immediate cremation or to be placed in a specially sealed casket. Meantime officials are tracking four dozen people, especially the 10 who had direct contact with Duncan. They include his fiancée and her family who were in the apartment where he stayed. Their pastor broke the news to them at a home where they're being quarantined, keeping he said, a safe distance.

GEORGE MASON (Wilshire Baptist Church Pastor): Their thoughts not only go to the shock and sadness of losing Mister Duncan, but also whether this will be the course that their life will take next.

MOTT: Tonight, NBC Dallas Affiliate KXAS reported that Senior Sergeant Michael Monnig who served Duncan's family that quarantine order, was admitted to the hospital here for observation after saying he felt ill. Ebola has not been confirmed. Nevertheless, a community remains on edge as they count down the 21 days of the incubation period.

MAYOR MIKE RAWLINGS (D-Dallas): I'm on pins and needles every period in Dallas this week and yes throughout the-- the whole 21 days.

MOTT: Now, in Nebraska today, the freelance cameraman working for NBC News in Liberia got a blood transfusion today with blood donated by Doctor Kent Brantly, one of the American survivors of Ebola. Doctor Brantly said he made an offer here to this hospital for Thomas Duncan, did not hear back. We asked the com-- we asked the hospital for comment tonight, Brian, we have not heard back.

WILLIAMS: Ron Mott starting us off from Dallas tonight. Ron, thanks.