Sir Winston Churchill Remarks on the Failures of the Treaty of Versailles

Cue Card preview image

General Information

Source:
NBC News
Creator:
N/A
Event Date:
03/31/1949
Air/Publish Date:
03/31/1949
Resource Type:
Video Speech
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
1949
Clip Length:
00:01:34

Description

Winston Churchill discusses the failures of the Treaty of Versailles and the misjudgment that the vanquished should pay the expenses of the victors.

Citation

MLA

"Sir Winston Churchill Remarks on the Failures of the Treaty of Versailles." NBC News. NBCUniversal Media. 31 Mar. 1949. NBC Learn. Web. 5 September 2012.

APA

(1949, March 31). Sir Winston Churchill Remarks on the Failures of the Treaty of Versailles. [Television series episode]. NBC News. Retrieved from https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=628

CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE

"Sir Winston Churchill Remarks on the Failures of the Treaty of Versailles" NBC News, New York, NY: NBC Universal, 03/31/1949. Accessed Wed Sep 5 2012 from NBC Learn: https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=628

Transcript

Sir Winston Churchill Remarks on the Failures of the Treaty of Versailles

SIR WINSTON CHURCHILL: After four years of hideous mechanical slaughter, illuminated by infinite sacrifice, but not remarkably relieved by strategy or generalship, the victorious allies assembled at Versailles. High hopes and spacious opportunities awaited them. War, stripped of every pretension of glamour or romance had been brought home to the masses of the peoples and brought home in forms never before experienced except by the defeated. To stop another war was the supreme object and duty of the statesmen who met as friends and allies around the Peace Table. They made great errors. The doctrine of self-determination was not the remedy for Europe, which needed then above all things, unity and larger groupings. The idea that the vanquished could pay the expenses of the victors was a destructive and crazy delusion. The failure to strangle Bolshevism at its birth and to bring Russia, then prostrate, by one means or another, into the general democratic system lies heavy upon us today.