Annie Dillard

Cue Card preview image

General Information

Source:
NBC News
Creator:
N/A
Event Date:
04/30/1945
Air/Publish Date:
08/03/2008
Resource Type:
Video Mini-Documentary
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
2008
Clip Length:
00:00:52

Description

Brief summary of writer's life and significance; list of some of the writer's most notable works; selection of notable quotes attributed to the writer, and "fun facts" about the writer.

Citation

MLA

"Annie Dillard." NBC News. NBCUniversal Media. 3 Aug. 2008. NBC Learn. Web. 17 January 2015.

APA

(2008, August 3). Annie Dillard. [Television series episode]. NBC News. Retrieved from https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=35213

CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE

"Annie Dillard" NBC News, New York, NY: NBC Universal, 08/03/2008. Accessed Sat Jan 17 2015 from NBC Learn: https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=35213

Transcript

Annie Dillard -  1945 -

Born Meta Annie Doak, April 30, 1945, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

American essayist, poet and novelist, often called a latter-day Henry David Thoreau because of her passion for nature and use of descriptive detail and metaphors.  Best known for her narrative nonfiction, especially her meditative account of a year spent along a creek in the Blue Ridge Mountains near Roanoke, Virginia.  She won the Pulitzer Prize for that integrated collection of essays, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, at the age of 29.

Notable Works

Nonfiction, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek  (1974)

Nonfiction,

Holy the Firm

(1977)

Essays,

Teaching a Stone to Talk

(1982) 

Poems,

Tickets for a Prayer Wheel 

(1974)

Essays,

The Writing Life

(1989)

Notable Quotes

Fun Facts:

Annie Dillard reads more than 100 books a year on a wide range of subjects – and re-reads one book every year: The Field Book of Ponds & Streams.

During her four seasons at Tinker Creek, Dillard filled 20 journals with notes, which she later transferred to notecards.  It took her eight months to turn the boxes of cards into the manuscript for Pilgrim at Tinker Creek.  Near the end, she was working 15 hours a day, avoiding company or news of the outside world, and living on cola and coffee. She lost 30 pounds – and all of her plants died.