Former Congressman John Anderson Runs for President Again in 1984

Cue Card preview image

General Information

Source:
NBC Nightly News
Creator:
Connie Chung/Ken Bode
Event Date:
02/03/1983
Air/Publish Date:
02/03/1983
Resource Type:
Video News Report
Copyright:
NBCUniversal Media, LLC.
Copyright Date:
1983
Clip Length:
00:02:09

Description

John Anderson added some excitement to the 1980 presidential campaign when he ran as an independent, and offered some alternatives to mainstream politics. Now, Anderson is running again in 1984 on the National Unity Platform, but his campaign has yet to catch fire.

Citation

MLA

"Former Congressman John Anderson Runs for President Again in 1984." Ken Bode, correspondent. NBC Nightly News. NBCUniversal Media. 3 Feb. 1983. NBC Learn. Web. 5 September 2012.

APA

Bode, K. (Reporter), & Chung, C. (Anchor). (1983, February 3). Former Congressman John Anderson Runs for President Again in 1984. [Television series episode]. NBC Nightly News. Retrieved from https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=3344

CHICAGO MANUAL OF STYLE

"Former Congressman John Anderson Runs for President Again in 1984" NBC Nightly News, New York, NY: NBC Universal, 02/03/1983. Accessed Wed Sep 5 2012 from NBC Learn: https://archives.nbclearn.com/portal/site/k-12/browse/?cuecard=3344

Transcript

Former Congressman John Anderson Runs for President Again in 1984

CONNIE CHUNG, anchor:

Former Congressman John Anderson added some excitement to the 1980 presidential campaign when he ran as an independent, and offered some alternatives to mainstream politics. But this time around, Anderson and his National Unity Party have yet to catch fire. In fact, as Ken Bode reports, the party is not yet fully formed.

KEN BODE reporting:

This group is trying to decide where to have the convention. Among the places mentioned, Omaha, Princeton and Portland, Maine.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: You want to find out something about Maine, you’re going to talk to Jane.

BODE: Other groups are drafting bylaws or trying to get the new party on the ballot. There are about 60 people here, Republicans and Democrats from about 30 states. Most were with Anderson in 1980. Not many present at the beginning, but that’s the way it was when Anderson began the last time around.

MARK BISNOW (Former Anderson Press Secretary): What is an ex-presidential candidate to do? He’s been up on the mountaintop. He’s also eligible for 6 million dollars apparently, and I think that distorts one’s view of the world.

BODE: Anderson got nearly 7% of the vote as an independent in 1980. Once his National Unity party has a convention and a nominee, it’s in line for nearly 6 million dollars in federal money up front. The two major parties each get 40 million.

JOHN ANDERSON (Presidential Candidate): The next vice president of the United States…

BODE: Anderson’s 1980 running mate, former Governor Pat Lucey, is now back among the Democrats, supporting Mondale.

PATRICK LUCEY (Former Wisconsin Governor): If he gets a small vote, it may create an element of mischief in terms of the effort that the rest of us are making to remove Ronald Reagan from the White House.

ANDERSON: Nobody can say that today. The issues have yet to be developed. The candidates have yet to be nominated. There is nobody that can tell almost a year before the election who it is that’s going to vote for this new party in November of 1984.

BODE: Polls now show that three quarters of the votes Anderson might get would come from Democrats. Anderson supporters are not put off by the idea they may help Ronald Reagan in 1984. They say if they have to worry about who they are helping or hurting in each election, they will never get a new party off the ground. Ken Bode, NBC News, Chevy Chase, Maryland.